SELF PORTRAIT

 

Self Portrait
BY DEBRA CHMELINA 2009
OIL/ACRYLIC ON CANVAS
16X12
  This self portrait is not for sale

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Click on the images above to view a slideshow of my paintings by category of Genre, Portraits, Still Life, or Scenic. Most of  my paintings were created from photographs of my travels, acquaintances or treasured things and depict everyday life.




Information about self portraits 

A portrait is a painting, photograph, sculpture, or other artistic representation of a person's own self, in which the face and its expression is predominant. The intent is to display the likeness, personality, and even the mood of the person's self. For this reason, in photography a portrait is generally not a snapshot, but a composed image of a person in a still position. A portrait often shows a person looking directly at the painter or photographer, in order to most successfully engage the subject with the viewer.

When the artist creates a portrait of him- or her self, it is called a self-portrait. Identifiable examples become numerous in the late Middle Ages, but if the definition is extended the first was by the Egyptian Pharaoh Akhenaten's sculptor Bak, who carved a representation of himself and his wife Taheri c. 1365 BC. However, it seems likely that self-portraits go back to the cave paintings, the earliest representational art, and literature records several classical examples that are now lost.

Portrait photography is a popular commercial industry all over the world. Many people enjoy having professionally made family portraits to hang in their homes, or special portraits to commemorate certain events, such as graduations or weddings.

Portrait photograph of Thomas Dilward by Mathew Brady.
Portrait photograph by Augusto De Luca

Since the dawn of photography, people have made portraits. The popularity of the daquerreotype in the middle of the 19th century was due in large part to the demand for inexpensive portraiture. Studios sprang up in cities around the world, some cranking out more than 500 plates a day. The style of these early works reflected the technical challenges associated with 30-second exposure times and the painterly aesthetic of the time. Subjects were generally seated against plain backgrounds and lit with the soft light of an overhead window and whatever else could be reflected with mirrors.

As photographic techniques developed, an intrepid group of photographers took their talents out of the studio and onto battlefields, across oceans and into remote wilderness. William Shew's Daguerreotype Saloon, Roger Fenton's Photographic Van and Mathew Brady's What-is-it? wagon set the standards for making portraits and other photographs in the field

Albrecht Durer  was an artist highly conscious of his public image and reputation, whose main income came from his old master prints, all containing his famous monogram, which were sold throughout Europe. He probably depicted himself more often than any artist before him, producing at least twelve images, including three oil portraits, and figures in four alterpieces.  The earliest is a silverpoint  drawing created when he was thirteen years old. At twenty-two Dürer painted the self portrait with Carnation (1493, Louvre), probably to send to his new fiancée. The Madrid self portrait (1498,Prado) depicts Dürer as a dandy in fashionable Italian dress, reflecting the international success he had achieved by then. In in his last self portrait, sold or given to the city of  Nuremberg, and displayed publicly, which very few portraits then were, the artist depicted himself with an unmistakable resemblance to Jesus Christ  (Munich, Alte Pinakothek). He later re-used the face in a religious engraving of, revealingly, the Veil of Veronica, Christ's own "self portrait" (B.25). A self portrait in gouache he sent to Raphael has not survived. A woodcut of a bathhouse and a drawing show virtually-nude self portraits




Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portrait
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