FEEDING

Feeding
BY DEBRA CHMELINA
OIL ON CANVAS 2010
11X14 W/O FRAME
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This painting depicts the struggles and simplicity of life in developing countries. Here, a young African women is amusing herself by taking time out of her strenuous duties of planting rice seedlings to feed her farm geese. Ultimately, the rice and geese will be sent to market to be sold so that her family can survive. The rice plant can be grown anywhere even on a steep hill or mountain, but in this painting the rice plant is on  flat terrain in Africa. Rice is normally grown as an annual plant, although in tropical areas it can survive as a perennial plant. The technique of impasto was used on the figures in the oil painting.

 

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 Information on Rice


Rice
 is the seed of the monocot plant Oryza sativa (Asian rice) or Oryza glaberrima (African rice). As a cereal grain, it is the most widely consumed plant food for a large part of the world's human population, especially in Asia and the West Indies. It is the grain with the second-highest worldwide production, after maize (corn), according to data for 2010.

Since a large portion of maize crops are grown for purposes other than human consumption,  rice is the most important grain with regard to human nutrition and caloric intake, providing more than one fifth of the calories consumed worldwide by the human species.

Genetic evidence has shown that rice originates from a single domestication 8,200–13,500 years ago, in the Pearl River valley region of China. Previously, archaeological evidence had suggested that the rice plant was domesticated in the Yangtze River valley region in China. From East Asia, the rice plant spread to Southeast and South Asia. The rice plant was introduced to Europe through Western Asia, and to the Americas through European colonization.

There are many varieties of rice and culinary preferences tend to vary regionally. In the Far East, there is a preference for softer and stickier varieties. Because of its importance as a staple food, rice has considerable cultural importance. The rice plant is often directly associated with prosperity and fertility. Therefore, there is the custom of throwing rice at weddings.

Rice is normally grown as an annual plant, although in tropical areas it can survive as a perennial plant and can produce a ratoon crop for up to 30 years. The rice plant can grow to 1–1.8 m (3.3–5.9 ft) tall, occasionally more depending on the variety and soil fertility. It has long, slender seedling leaves 50–100 cm (20–39 in) long and 2–2.5 cm (0.79–0.98 in) broad. The small wind pollinated flowers are produced in a branched arching to pendulous inflorescence 30–50 cm (12–20 in) long. The edible seed is a grain (caryopsis) 5–12 mm (0.20–0.47 in) long and 2–3 mm (0.079–0.12 in) thick.

Oryza sativa rice plant, commonly known as Asian rice seedling.

 

Rice cultivation is well-suited to countries and regions with low labor costs and high rainfall, as it is labor-intensive to cultivate and requires ample water.The rice plant can be grown practically anywhere, even on a steep hill or mountain. Although its parent species are native to Asia and certain parts of Africa, centuries of trade and exportation have made the rice plant commonplace in many cultures worldwide.

The traditional method for cultivating the rice plant  is flooding the fields while, or after, setting the young seedlings. This simple method requires sound planning and servicing of the water damming and channeling, but reduces the growth of less robust weed plant  and pest plant that have no submerged growth state, and deters vermin. While flooding is not mandatory for the cultivation of rice, all other methods of irrigation require higher effort in weed and pest control during growth periods and a different approach for fertilizing the soil.

The name wild rice is usually used for species of the grass plant genus Zizania, both wild and domesticated, although the term may also be used for primitive or uncultivated varieties of  the Oryza rice plant.

Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rice




Information about Geese

In  Europe , northern  Africa, and western Asia, the original domesticated geese are derived from the Greylag Goose Anser anser. In eastern Asia, the original domesticated geese are derived from the Swan Goose Anser cygnoides; these are now known as Chinese geese. Both have been widely introduced in more recent times, and modern flocks in both areas (and elsewhere, such as  Australia and North America) may consist of either species, and/or hybrids between them. Chinese geese may be readily distinguished from European geese by the large knob at the base of the bill, though hybrids may exhibit every degree of variation between them.

Geese are waterfowl belonging to the tribe Anserini of the famil Anaticlae.  This tribe comprises the genera  Anser (the grey geese),Branta (the black geese) and Chen (the white geese). A number of other birds, mostly related to the shelducks, have "goose" as part of their name. More distantly related members of the Anatidae family are swans, most of which are larger than true geese, and ducks, which are smaller.

Geese are monogamous, living in permanent pairs throughout the year; however, unlike most other permanently monogamous animals, geese are territorial only during the short nesting season. Paired geese are more dominant and feed more, two factors that result in more young geese.

Geese produce large edible eggs, weighing 120–170 grams (4.2–6.0 oz). They can be used in cooking just like chicken's eggs, though they have proportionally more yolk, and this cooks to a slightly denser consistency. The taste is much the same as that of a chicken egg, but more gamey.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domestic_goose

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