JUDY WRIGHT

Yuma's Online Art Gallery, art by deb welcomes artist Judy Wright Village Art Gallery member as she joins us in sharing her paintings on the world wide web.

Good luck Judy


SUMMER FRUIT
watercolor
18X21 with frame



DESERT FIRE
watercolor
20X27 with frame



GREENS
watercolor
18X21 with frame



EAST OF PICACHO
watercolor
14X18 with frame



ROADRUNNER
water color on clayboard
14X16 with frame

 

     BIRDIE ON THE 16TH HOLE 
    WATERCOLOR
    14X17 WITH FRAME

 



SAGUARO TWILIGHT
watercolor
16X19 with frame

MACPHERSON PASS
watercolor
26X32 with frame



Village Art Gallery is a non profit art gallery in Yuma, Arizona. When you purchase artwork from a member of Village Art Gallery the profits help school students get the art supplies they need to participate in shows throughout the year.


 

Yuma Online Art Gallery, art by deb features local artist Judy Wright. You can support your local artists by visiting Village Art Gallery online or at the gallery itself. 

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Background history of watercolor painting

Although watercolor painting is extremely old, dating perhaps to the cave paintings of paleolithic Europe, and has been used for manuscript illumination since at least Egyptian times but especially in the European Middle Ages, its continuous history as an art medium begins in the Renaissance. The German Northern Renaissance artist Albrecht Durer (1471–1528) who painted several fine botanical, wildlife and landscape watercolors, is generally considered among the earliest exponents of the medium. An important school of watercolor painting in Germany was led by Hans Bols (1534–1593) as part of the Durer Renaissance.

Despite this early start, watercolor was generally used by Baroque easel painters only for sketches, copies or cartoons (full-scale design drawings). Among notable early practitioners of watercolor painting were Van Dyck (during his stay in England), Claude Lorraine, Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione, and many Dutch and Flemish artists. However, Botanical illustrations and those depicting wildlife are perhaps the oldest and most important tradition in watercolor painting. Botanical illustrations became popular in the Renaissance, both as hand tinted woodblock illustrations in books or broadsheets and as tinted ink drawings on vellum or paper. Botanical artists have always been among the most exacting and accomplished watercolor painters, and even today watercolors—with their unique ability to summarize, clarify and idealize in full color—are used to illustrate scientific and museum publications. Wildlife illustration reached its peak in the 19th century with artists such as John James Audubon, and today many naturalist field guides are still illustrated with watercolor paintings. Many watercolors are more vibrant in pigment if they are higher quality. Some British market watercolors can be found in many craft stores In America and in other countries too.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watercolor_painting

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