KAY HUTCHISON

Yuma Online Art Gallery, art by deb welcomes local artist Kay Hutchison a member of Villlage Art Gallery as she joins us in sharing her art on the world wide web.
 
Good luck Kay


HORSE OF A DIFFERENT COLOR
WATERCOLOR
17X20 WITH FRAME

 


GLORY IN THE MORNING
WATERCOLOR
14X17 WITH FRAME

 

 


CONE FLOWERS
WATERCOLOR
13X16 WITH FRAME


 

NIGHTBLOOMER
WATER COLOR
17X22 WITH FRAME

 

 


BEADED NECKLACE



PEACOCK LADY
GOURD ART



KACHINA DOLL
GOURD ART

 



TIED GOURD
GOURD ART


GOURD POTTERY
GOURD ART




Village Art Gallery is a non profit art gallery in Yuma, Arizona. When you purchase artwork from a member of Village Art Gallery the profits help school students get the art supplies they need to participate in shows throughout the year.

Yuma Online Art Gallery, art by deb features local artist Kay Hutchison. You can support your local artists by visiting Village Art Gallery online or at the gallery itself.

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Information about Gourds

The bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) has had a complex domestication history written for it over the past twenty years. However, recent DNA research suggests that it was domesticated twice: in Asia, at least 10,000 years ago, and again in Africa, about 4,000 years ago. Its dispersal throughout Polynesia is also a key part of evidence supporting Polynesian discovery of the New World, circa 1000 AD.

The bottle gourd is a diploid, monoecious plant of the Cucurbitacea. The plant has thick vines with large white flowers that open only at night. The fruit comes in a large variety of shapes, selected for by their human users. The bottle gourd is primarily grown for its fruit, which when dried forms a woody rind that is suitable for containing water and food, for fishing floats, for musical instruments and for clothing, among other things. In fact, the fruit floats, and bottle gourds with still-viable seeds have been discovered after floating in sea water for more than seven months. 

The bottle gourd is native to Africa: wild populations of the plant have recently been discovered in Zimbabwe. Two subspecies, likely representing two separate domestication events, have been identified: Lagenaria siceraria spp. siceraria (in Africa, domesticated some 4,000 years ago) and L. s. spp. asiatica (Asia, domesticated at least 10,000 years ago, probably more like 12,000 years ago).

Domesticated bottle gourds have been identified in the Americas at sites such as Guila Naquitz in Mexico by ~10,000 years ago. DNA sequences of rinds discovered in precontact America are of the Asian sub-variety. Post-contact rinds are of the African sub-variety, and are believed to have been introduced into the Americas by the Spanish or other colonizers.

Asian bottle gourds (spp. asiatica) have been discovered in China and Japan by approximately 8,000-9,000 years ago, and it is likely that the earliest domestication of the bottle gourd occurred someplace in Asia, some three to four thousand years before that.

Source: http://archaeology.about.com/od/bterms/qt/bottle_gourd.htm

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