DIXIE JACK

Yuma's Online Art Gallery, art by deb welcomes artist Dixie Jack a member of Village Art Gallery as she joins us in sharing her paintings and mosaics on the world wide web.

 Good luck Dixie

THE GUARDIAN
25x31 WITH FRAME
OIL ON CANVAS




CLOSEUP OFTHE GUARDIAN



PANTHER
MOSAIC
32X48 WITH FRAME

PHOENIX
MOSAIC WITH FRAME

THE SEER
20X22 WITH FRAME 
OIL ON CANVAS



Village Art Gallery is a non profit art gallery in Yuma, Arizona. When you purchase artwork from a member of Village Art Gallery the profits help school students get the art supplies they need to participate in shows throughout the year.

Yuma’s Online Art Gallery, art by deb features local artist Dixie Jack a member of Village Art Gallery. You can support your local artists by visiting Village Art Gallery online or at the gallery itself.

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Information about Mosaic Art

Small pieces of glass in mosaics were first used by the Egyptians during the New Kingdom (c. 1550 to 1069 B.C.). Very small pieces of dull-colored glass were used to make mosaic jewelry and mosaic stones. The stones were added to wall pieces and inlays, usually in funerary art. It wasn’t until the Roman Empire took control of Egypt in 31 B.C. that glass production would advance to a higher art form in Egypt. With an abundance of sand and soda, and with years of mastering the art, Egypt created much of the glass for the Roman nobles.

By the eighth century B.C., mosaics of random patterns were being assembled from black and white pebbles in Gordium (Gordion, Turkey). The pebble mosaics added art and design to an area and provided some protection during inclement weather. Six centuries later, mosaic floors—a precursor to the tile floors of today—were widespread among the Greek nobles. Smooth river rocks, with smaller pebbles used to fill in the gaps and create more detailed designs, were used to form floors and pathways. Mosaic art was further defined with the introduction of tesserae, pieces of stone and glass cut into small squares. These mosaic tiles of small uniform pieces made it much easier to create intricate designs.

As the Roman Empire expanded, mosaic art grew with it. The mosaics at Pompeii are an excellent example of the styles and types of designs the Romans preferred. Marble tiles became a popular choice for floor mosaics and styles ranged from geometric patterns to bucolic scenes. An excavation in Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) revealed one of the largest collections of mosaic floors from the second century A.D. Many are on display at the Hatay Archaeological Museum in Antakya.

Mosaic art has a long and varied history, and although it was widely popular in Europe and the Near East, examples of ancient mosaics have been uncovered in China and South America. Mosaics served a purpose of protecting walls and floors from wind and water, as well as adding a decorative element With each advancing civilization, mosaic art advanced with it—from clay stones to colored glass, from smooth river rocks to tesserae and smalti. Today, mosaic art has become even more specialized with varied materials combined in a blending of artistic interpretation.

Source: http://suite101.com/article/the-history-of-mosaic-art-a133918#.UWXhML7n8dU
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