LESLIE CANNELL

 Yuma Online Art Gallery art by deb welcomes artist Leslie Cannell member of Village Art Gallery as she joins us in sharing her paintings on the world wide web.

 Good luck Leslie



SANTA FE ADOBES
watercolor
16X20 with matted frame



MENDOCINO ON A CLEAR DAY
watercolor
16X20 with matted frame

 


AFTER THE RAIN 
watercolor
16X20 with matted frame



CACTUS WONDER
watercolor
25X31 with frame


 



HERON AT SUNSET
watercolor
19X23 with frame



DAY'S END
watercolor
17X21 with frame

 



STRUTTING HIS STUFF
watercolor
17X20 with frame
(All of frame not shown)



GAMBLE'S QUAIL
watercolor
17X21 with frame



Village Art Gallery is a non profit art gallery in Yuma, Arizona. When you purchase artwork from a member of Village Art Gallery the profits benefit school students by helping themĀ get the art supplies they need to participate in shows throughout the year.

Yuma’s Online Art Gallery, art by deb features Leslie Cannell a local artist, and member of Village Art Gallery. You can support your local artists by visiting Village Art Gallery online or at the gallery itself.

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Information about Gambel's Quail

A bird of the Desert Southwest, Gambel's Quail is common in much of the Southwest, particularly southern Arizona and New Mexico. Here they look and act very much like the more widespread California Quail, but the two species' ranges do not overlap. Look for these tubby birds running between cover in suburbs and open desert or posting a lookout on low shrubs.
Source: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Gambels_Quail/id

About Watercolor Paint

Watercolor paints are customarily evaluated on a few key attributes. In the partisan debates of the 19th-century English art world, gouache was emphatically contrasted to traditional watercolors and denigrated for its high hiding power or lack of "transparency"; "transparent" watercolors were exalted. Paints with low hiding power are valued because they allow an underdrawing or engraving to show in the image, and because colors can be mixed visually by layering paints on the paper (which itself may be either white or tinted). The resulting color will change depending on the layering order of the pigments. In fact, there are very few genuinely transparent watercolors, neither are there completely opaque watercolors (with the exception of gouache); and any watercolor paint can be made more transparent simply by diluting it with water.

"Transparent" colors do not contain titanium dioxide (white) or most of the earth pigments (sienna, umber, etc.) which are very opaque. The 19th-century claim that "transparent" watercolors gain "luminosity" because they function like a pane of stained glass laid on paper – the color intensified because the light passes through the pigment, reflects from the paper, and passes a second time through the pigment on its way to the viewer—is false: watercolor paints do not form a cohesive paint layer, as do acrylic or oil paints, but simply scatter pigment particles randomly across the paper surface; the transparency consists in the paper being directly visible between the particles. Watercolors appear more vivid than acrylics or oils because the pigments are laid down in a more pure form with no or fewer fillers (such as kaolin) obscuring the pigment colors. Furthermore, typically most or all of the gum binder will be absorbed by the paper, preventing it from changing the visibility of the pigment. Even multiple layers of watercolor do achieve a very luminous effect without fillers or binder obscuring the pigment particles.
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