PATTI BARAK

Yuma's Online Art Gallery, art by deb welcomes artist Patti Barak a member of Village Art Gallery as she joins us in sharing her paintings on the world wide web.
 Good luck Patti

OOPS!
OIL/IVORY KEY
5X4 WITH FRAME

PRETTY PALOMINO
OIL/PIANO KEY
5X4 WITH FRAME

WEAVIN' DAY
OIL/PIANO KEY
5X4 WITH FRAME 

Patti Barak specializes in miniature oil paintings on ivory piano keys. These affordable works of art make unique gifts. Patti's art can be seen at Village Art Gallery in Yuma. 

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Information about Ivory

Ivory is a hard, white material, derived from the tusks and teeth of animals, that is used in art or manufacturing. It consists of dentine, a tissue that is similar to bone. It has been important since ancient times for making a range of items, from ivory carvings to false teeth, fans, dominoes and joint tubes. Elephant ivory has been the most important source, but ivory from many species including the hippopotamus, walrus, pig, mammoth,sperm whale,and narwhal has been used. The word ultimately derives from the Ancient Egyptian âb, âbu "elephant", through the Latin ebor- or ebur.

The use and trade of elephant ivory have become controversial, because they have contributed to seriously declining elephant populations in many countries. In 1975, the Asian elephant was placed on Appendix One of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, which prevents international trade between member countries. The African elephant was placed on Appendix One in January 1990. Since then, some southern African countries have had their populations of elephants "downlisted" to Appendix Two, allowing sale of some stockpile.

Ivory has many ornamental and practical uses. Prior to the introduction of plastics, it was used forbilliard balls, piano keys, Scottish bagpipes, buttons and a wide range of ornamental items. Synthetic substitutes for ivory have been developed. Plastics have been viewed by piano purists as an inferior ivory substitute on piano keys, although other recently developed materials more closely resemble the feel of real ivory.

The chemical structure of the teeth and tusks of mammals is the same, regardless of the species of origin. The trade in certain teeth and tusks other than elephant is well established and widespread; therefore, "ivory" can correctly be used to describe any mammalian teeth or tusks of commercial interest which are large enough to be carved or scrimshawed (crocodile teeth are also used).


Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivory

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